Islamic calendar

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

The Islamic calendar (Arabic: التقويم الهجري) is a calendar. It is used to determine islamic holidays. It is a lunar calendar. It has 12 months, and about 354 days. This means that each year, the calendar is about 11 days shorter than a solar calendar, like the Gregorian. Islamic years are often called hijra years, because the first year of the calendar when the hijra occurred, that is when Muhammad went from Mecca to Medina. Each year is therefore labelled with either H or AH.

What the months are called[change | change source]

  1. Muharram محرّم (long form: Muḥarram ul Ḥaram)
  2. Safar صفر (long form: Ṣafar ul Muzaffar)
  3. Rabi' al-awwal (Rabī' I) ربيع الأول
  4. Rabi' al-thani (or Rabī' al Thānī, or Rabī' al-Akhir) (Rabī' II) ربيع الآخر أو ربيع الثاني
  5. Jumada al-awwal (Jumādā I) جمادى الأول
  6. Jumada al-thani (or Jumādā al-akhir) (Jumādā II) جمادى الآخر أو جمادى الثاني
  7. Rajab رجب (long form: Rajab al Murajab)
  8. Sha'aban شعبان (long form: Sha'abān ul Moazam)
  9. Ramadan رمضان (or Ramzān, long form: Ramaḍān ul Mubarak)
  10. Shawwal شوّال (long form: Shawwal ul Mukarram)
  11. Dhu al-Qi'dah ذو القعدة
  12. Dhu al-Hijjah ذو الحجة

Other websites[change | change source]