James Thurber

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James Thurber
Born James Grover Thurber
December 8, 1894(1894-12-08)
Columbus, Ohio, U.S.
Died November 2, 1961(1961-11-02) (aged 66)
New York City, U.S.
Occupation Humorist
Nationality American
Period 1894–1961
Genres short stories, cartoons, essays
Subjects humor, language
Notable work(s) My Life and Hard Times,
My World and Welcome to It

James Grover Thurber (December 8, 1894 – November 2, 1961) was an American author, journalist, and cartoonist. Thurber was best known for his cartoons and short stories. He published his stories mainly in The New Yorker magazine. One of the most popular humorists of his time, Thurber celebrated the comic frustrations and eccentricities of ordinary people.

Thurber died on November 2, 1961 from complications from pneumonia and a stroke, aged 66. His last words, aside from the repeated word "God," were "God bless... God damn," according to his wife.[1]

References[change | change source]

  1. Bernstein, Burton (1975). Thurber. New York: Dodd, Mead & Company. p. 501. ISBN 0-396-07027-2.

Other websites[change | change source]

Media related to James Thurber at Wikimedia Commons