John Payne

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John Payne
Born John Howard Payne
May 28, 1912(1912-05-28)
Roanoke, Virginia, U.S.
Died December 6, 1989
Malibu, California, U.S.
Nationality American
Occupation actor / singer

John Payne (May 28, 1912 - December 6, 1989) was an American actor and singer.

Career[change | edit source]

John Payne began his career playing a small role in the William Wyler movie Dodsworth (1936). In 1938 he got a role in the comedy College Swing, directed by Raoul Walsh. He appeared on Broadway from 1935 to 1939. His first starring role was playing a boxer Steve Nelson in Kid Nightingale (1939), directed by George Amy. John Payne work with Randolph Scott and Maureen O'Hara in the war movie To the Shores of Tripoli (1942), directed by H. Bruce Humberstone. In 1946 he got the role co-starring in Miracle on 34th Street (1947), directed by George Seaton. Another great movie starring Payne was Kansas City Confidential (1952), directed by Phil Karlson. In this movie Payne plays an ex-convict trying to become a part of society who people think robbed many armored car. He has also been a regular performer in Westerns movies El Paso (1949), The Eagle and the Hawk (1950) and Passage West (1951) directed by Lewis R. Foster, The Vanquished (1953), directed by Edward Ludwig, Silver Lode (1954), directed by Allan Dwan, Rails Into Laramie (1954) directed by Jesse Hibbs, Santa Fe Passage (1955) directed by William Witney, The Road to Denver (1955), directed by Joseph Kane, Tennessee's Partner (1955), where he worked with Ronald Reagan, directed by Allan Dwan, and Rebel in Town (1956) by Alfred L. Werker.

Television[change | edit source]

John Payne also had success in television. He was the star of western The Restless Gun. It was a television series broadcast on NBC between 1957 and 1959, Payne starred as Vint Bonner, a lone cowboy and former Confederate soldier. He also made ​​appearances in Zane Grey Theater (1957), The Dick Powell Show (1962), The Name of the Game (1968), Gunsmoke (1970), Cade's County (1971), and Columbo (1975).

References[change | edit source]

Other websites[change | edit source]