Legion of Honour

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
National Order of the Legion of Honour
Ordre national de la Légion d'honneur
Offizierskreuz.jpg
Officier medal of the French Légion d'honneur
Awarded by France
Type Order with five degrees
Awarded for Excellent civil or military conduct delivered, upon official investigation
Status Open since 1802
Statistics
Established 19 May 1802
First awarded 14 July 1804
Distinct
recipients

Knight: 74,384
Officer: 17,032
Commander: 3,009
Grand Officer: 314
Grand Cross: 67
Precedence
Next (higher) None
Next (lower) Ordre de la Libération
Legion Honneur GC ribbon.svg
Grand'croix

Legion Honneur GO ribbon.svg
Grand Officier
Legion Honneur Commandeur ribbon.svg
Commandeur
Legion Honneur Officier ribbon.svg
Officier
Legion Honneur Chevalier ribbon.svg
Chevalier
Ribbon bars of the order

The Legion of Honour (French: Ordre national de la Légion d'honneur)[1] is the highest French award.

It was established by Napoleon Bonaparte on 19 May 1802.

The Order is the highest decoration in France and is divided into five degrees: Chevalier (Knight), Officier (Officer), Commandeur (Commander), Grand Officier (Grand Officer) and Grand Croix (Grand Cross).

The order's motto is Honneur et Patrie ('Honour and Country'), and its seat is the Palais de la Légion d'Honneur on the left bank of the River Seine in Paris.

References[change | change source]

  1. Formerly the Royal Order of the Legion of Honour (Ordre royale de la Légion d'honneur)