Louis Sullivan

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Louis Sullivan; an oil painting by Frank A. Werner, 1919. From the collection of the Chicago Historical Society

Louis Henry Sullivan (September 3, 1856 - April 14, 1924) was an American architect. He was born in Boston, Massachusetts. Many people call him the creator of the modern skyscraper. Along with Henry Hobson Richardson and Frank Lloyd Wright, he is one of "the recognized trinity of American architecture.[1] He was a critic at the Chicago School. Sullivan was also a mentor to Frank Lloyd Wright.[2] He died in Chicago.

References[change | change source]

  1. James F. O'Gorman, Three American Architects: Richardson, Sullivan, and Wright, 1865-1915 (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1991), p. xv
  2. Gretchen Will Mayo, Frank Lloyd Wright (Milwaukee, WI: World Almanac Library, 2004), p. 18