Magnesium oxide

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Magnesium oxide
Magnesium oxide.jpg
NaCl polyhedra.png
IUPAC name Magnesium oxide
Other names Magnesia
Periclase
Identifiers
CAS number 1309-48-4
PubChem 14792
RTECS number OM3850000
ATC code A02AA02,A06AD02, A12CC10
Properties
Molecular formula MgO
Molar mass 40.3044 g/mol
Appearance White powder
Odor Odorless
Density 3.58 g/cm³
Melting point

2852 °C, 3125 K, 5166 °F

Boiling point

3600 °C, 3873 K, 6512 °F

Solubility in water 0.0086 g/100 mL (30 °C)
Solubility Soluble in acid, ammonia
insoluble in alcohol
Acidity (pKa) 10.3
Band gap 7.8 eV[1]
Thermal conductivity 45–60 W·m−1·K−1[2]
Refractive index (nD) 1.736
Structure
Crystal structure Halite (cubic), cF8
Space group Fm3m, No. 225
Coordination
geometry
Octahedral (Mg2+); octahedral (O2–)
Thermochemistry
Std enthalpy of
formation
ΔfHo298
−602 kJ·mol−1[3]
Standard molar
entropy
So298
27 J·mol−1·K−1[3]
Hazards
MSDS ICSC 0504
EU Index Not listed
Main hazards Metal fume fever, Irritant
NFPA 704

NFPA 704.svg

0
1
0
 
R-phrases R36, R37, R38
Flash point Non-flammable
Related compounds
Other anions Magnesium sulfide
Other cations Beryllium oxide
Calcium oxide
Strontium oxide
Barium oxide
Related compounds Magnesium hydroxide
Magnesium nitride
Except where noted otherwise, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C, 100 kPa)

Magnesium oxide, or magnesia, is a white solid mineral, made of one part magnesium and one part oxygen. Its chemical formula is MgO. Magnesium oxide is used by libraries to make books last longer. It is also used as an insulator for some electrical wires, and to help crucibles resist high temperatures. Magnesium oxide is also used to treat heartburn and upset stomachs.

References[change | change source]

  1. Taurian, O.E.; Springborg, M.; Christensen, N.E. (1985). "Self-consistent electronic structures of MgO and SrO". Solid State Communications 55 (4): 351–5. doi:10.1016/0038-1098(85)90622-2. http://users-phys.au.dk/nec/Papers/necSSC/SSC55351.pdf.
  2. Application of magnesium compounds to insulating heat-conductive fillers. konoshima.co.jp
  3. 3.0 3.1 Zumdahl, Steven S. (2009). Chemical Principles (6th ed.). Houghton Mifflin Company. p. A22. ISBN 0-618-94690-X.