Mars flyby

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Data collected from Mariner 4's flyby on a modern map

A Mars flyby is when a spacecraft passes near the planet Mars, but does not enter orbit or land on it.[1] Unmanned (no humans on board) space probes have used this method to collect data on Mars.[2] A spacecraft that is built for a flyby is also known as a "flyby bus" or "flyby spacecraft".[3]

List of Mars flybys[change | edit source]

References[change | edit source]

  1. Page 15-16 in Chapter 3 of David S. F. Portree's Humans to Mars: Fifty Years of Mission Planning, 1950 - 2000, NASA Monographs in Aerospace History Series, Number 21, February 2001. Available as NASA SP-2001-4521.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Space probe performs Mars fly-by - BBC
  3. Joseph A. Angelo - Encyclopedia Of Space And Astronomy (2006) - Page 171
  4. Rayman, Marc D.. "Dawn Journal: Aiming away from a bull's eye at Mars". The Planetary Society. http://www.planetary.org/blog/article/00001755/. Retrieved 2010-03-21.
  5. Malik, Tariq (February 18, 2009). "Asteroid-Bound Probe Zooms Past Mars". Space.com. http://www.space.com/missionlaunches/090218-dawn-asteroid-mars.html. Retrieved 2010-03-21.
  6. ESA - Rosetta successfully swings-by Mars,
  7. NSSDC - Nozomi
  8. McDowell, Jonathan. "Launch Log". Jonathan's Space Page. http://planet4589.org/space/log/launchlog.txt. Retrieved 29 July 2010.
  9. Zak, Anatoly. "Russia's unmanned missions to Mars". RussianSpaecWeb. http://www.russianspaceweb.com/spacecraft_planetary_mars.html. Retrieved 29 July 2010.
  10. Wade, Mark. "Mars". Encyclopedia Astronautica. http://www.astronautix.com/project/mars.htm. Retrieved 29 July 2010.
  11. 11.0 11.1 The Soviet Mars program, Professor Chris Mihos, Case Western Reserve University
  12. NASA - Mars 6

Other websites[change | edit source]