Sargent Shriver

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Sargent Shriver
Shriver in 1961
21st United States Ambassador to France
In office
April 22, 1968 – March 25, 1970
Nominated by Lyndon B. Johnson
Preceded by Charles E. Bohlen
Succeeded by Arthur K. Watson
1st Director of the OEO
In office
October 17, 1964[1] – March 22, 1968[1]
President Lyndon B. Johnson
Preceded by Office Created
Succeeded by Bertrand Harding
1st Director of the Peace Corps
In office
March 22, 1961 – February 28, 1966[2]
President John F. Kennedy
Lyndon B. Johnson
Preceded by Office Created
Succeeded by Jack Vaughn
Personal details
Born Robert Sargent Shriver, Jr.
November 9, 1915(1915-11-09)
Westminster, Maryland, U.S.
Died January 18, 2011(2011-01-18) (aged 95)
Bethesda, Maryland, U.S.
Nationality American
Political party Democratic
Spouse(s) Eunice Kennedy Shriver (m. 1953–2009, her death)
Relations Arnold Schwarzenegger (son-in-law)
Children Robert Sargent Shriver III
Maria Owings Shriver
Timothy Perry Shriver
Mark Kennedy Shriver
Anthony Paul Kennedy Shriver
Alma mater Yale University
Yale Law School
Profession Attorney
Religion Roman Catholicism
Signature
Military service
Allegiance United States of America
Service/branch United States Navy
Years of service 1941–1945
Rank Lieutenant
Battles/wars World War II
Awards World War II Victory Medal, Purple Heart, Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal[3]

Robert Sargent Shriver, Jr. (November 9, 1915 – January 18, 2011) was an American politician who was the first director of the Peace Corps from 1961 until 1966, then he was the first director of the OEO from 1964 until 1968, and was the 21st ambassador to France from 1968 until 1970. He was also a Vice President nominee with presidential nominee George McGovern in 1972, they lost to Richard Nixon and to Spiro Agnew. He was also an activist.

Early life[change | change source]

Shriver was born in Westminster, Maryland on November 9, 1915[4] and was educated at Yale University and at Yale Law School. He had served in the army during World War II from 1941 through 1945 and was awarded a Purple Heart for his wounds during the war.

Personal life[change | change source]

In 1953 Shriver married Eunice Kennedy (the sister of John F. Kennedy) and together they had 5 children; Robert Sargent Shriver III, Maria Shriver (the wife of Arnold Schwarzenegger), Timothy Peter Shriver, Mark Kennedy Shriver, and Anthony Paul Kennedy Shriver.

Health[change | change source]

In 2003 Shriver was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease and has began to loose his memory and couldn't even name his own wife due to the disease. His daughter Maria Shriver wrote a children's book based on the disease.[5]

Later life[change | change source]

Shriver's wife of 56 years Eunice Kennedy Shriver died on August 11, 2009 from a stroke,[6] two weeks later his brother-in-law Ted Kennedy died on August 25, 2009 from brain cancer.[7]

Death[change | change source]

On January 18, 2011 Sargent Shriver died in Bethesda, Maryland from the disease, he was 95 years old. He is buried next to his wife at the St. Francis Xavier Cemetery.[8]

References[change | change source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 capsolano.org/cap_general_info/caa_history.pdf
  2. Past Directors.
  3. Herbert, Bob (April 23, 2004). "A Muscular Idealism". The New York Times. http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9B03E5D9143AF930A15757C0A9629C8B63. Retrieved December 5, 2008.
  4. "The New Nominee No Longer Half a Kennedy". Time. August 14, 1972. http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,906202-1,00.html. Retrieved September 27, 2008.
  5. Shriver, Maria (April 28, 2004). What's Happening to Grandpa?. Little, Brown Young Readers. ISBN 978-0-316-00101-4 .
  6. Grinberg, Emanuella (undated). "Eunice Kennedy Shriver dies". Edition.cnn.com. http://edition.cnn.com/2009/POLITICS/08/11/eunice.kennedy.shriver/. Retrieved August 11, 2009.
  7. "Ted Kennedy Dies of Brain Cancer at Age 77". ABC News. August 26, 2009. http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/TedKennedy/story?id=6692022. Retrieved August 26, 2009.
  8. McFadden, Robert D. (January 18, 2011). "R. Sargent Shriver, Peace Corps Leader, Dies at 95". The New York Times. http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/19/us/politics/19shriver.html. Retrieved January 18, 2011.

Other websites[change | change source]

Media related to Sargent Shriver at Wikimedia Commons