Type 92 105 mm cannon

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Type 92 105 mm cannon
Type 92 105mm field gun.jpg
Type 92 105 mm cannon
Type Field gun
Place of origin  Empire of Japan
Service history
In service 1932-1945
Used by War flag of the Imperial Japanese Army.svgImperial Japanese Army
Wars Second Sino-Japanese War
Soviet-Japanese Border Wars
World War II
Production history
Designer Osaka Arsenal
Manufacturer Osaka Arsenal
Produced 1932-?
Number built 180
Specifications
Weight 3,732.3 kilograms (8,228 lb)
Barrel length 4.681 metres (15 ft 4 in) L/45

Shell 15.77 kilograms (34 lb 12 oz)
Caliber 105 mm (4.13 in)
Recoil hydropneumatic
Carriage split trail
Elevation -5° to +45°
Traverse 36°
Rate of fire 6-8 rpm
Muzzle velocity 760 m/s (2,493 ft/s)
Maximum range 18,300 metres (20,000 yd)
Sights panoramic

Type 92 105 mm cannon (九二式十糎加農砲 Kyūni-shiki Jyū-senchi Kannohō?), also known as a "10-cm" gun,[1] was a cannon of the Imperial Japanese Army (IJA).[2] It was used during World War II.[3]

This artillery piece was used during the Second Sino-Japanese War and World War II.

It was intended to supersede the Type 14 105 mm cannon in front line combat service.

History[change | edit source]

A Type 92 prototype was completed in 1932. Less than 200 Type92s were made.

Combat record[change | edit source]

The cannon was first used in combat at the Battle of Nomonhan.

In 1942, it was used during the Bataan and Corregidor Island.[1]

On Guadalcanal, the US Marines called these guns "Pistol Petes".[1]

Related pages[change | edit source]

References[change | edit source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Rottman, Gordon L. (2005). Japanese Army in World War II: Conquest of the Pacific 1941-42, p. 50; excerpt, "Japanese '10cm' weapons were actually 105mm weapons."
  2. This field gun type was named "ninety-two" because its design was completed in 1932; and 1932 was the 2592th year since Emperor Jimmu, the first Emperor of Japan. The Japanese Imperial year was Kōki 2592 (皇紀2592年).
  3. "Model 92 105 mm cannon," US Technical Manual, pp. 226-228; retrieved 2012-2-19.

Other websites[change | edit source]