Velocity

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Velocity is a measure of how fast something has moved in a particular direction. [1] In physics, velocity means the time it took an object to move from one place to another (displacement), and the direction of movement - this is known as a vector quantity. An object could travel at 7 metres per second in a direction of 30 degress south of east. This is velocity.[2]

\text{velocity} = \frac\text{displacement}\text{time} plus direction.[1]

So for example something that moves in a square, and finishes back where it started, has not been displaced. This would mean that the object's displacement = zero, and it would have a velocity of zero.[1] It is different to the speed that it moved around the square. People often use velocity and speed to mean the same thing, but they are different, velocity must have a direction.

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