Zira Tehsil

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Zira (Urdu: تحصیل زرا) was one of the two tehsils of the Punjab, (the other one being Ferozpur), that was part of a controversy during the Partition of India. Sir Cyril Radcliffe created the boundary between India and Pakistan just days before the partition. A draft of the Award was supposedly sent to Evan Jenkins, the provincial governor of Punjab by George Abell, Lord Mountbatten’s private secretary, with a preliminary description of the Punjab boundary. This draft showed the Ferozepur and Zira tehsils being allotted to Pakistan.

The final version of the boundary however awarded the areas to India. This led Muhammad Ali Jinnah, the founder of Pakistan, to proclaim that the Award of the Boundary Commission was unjust, incomprehensible and perverse. He, however, agreed to abide by it.[1] The dispute was settled in 1960 as part of an agreement between the governments of India and Pakistan.[2]

References[change | change source]

  1. "Pakistan government website". Archived from the original on January 27, 2006. http://web.archive.org/web/20060127230735/http://www.pakistan.gov.pk/Quaid/leader18.htm. Retrieved July 24, 2006.
  2. "Punjab: Firozpur", Gazeteer of India (1), 11 January 1960, http://punjabrevenue.nic.in/gazfzpr1.htm, retrieved 14 December 2011