Jump to content

1939 Erzincan earthquake

Coordinates: 39°46′N 39°35′E / 39.77°N 39.58°E / 39.77; 39.58
From Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
1939 Erzincan earthquake
1939 Erzincan earthquake is located in Turkey
1939 Erzincan earthquake
UTC time1939-12-26 23:57:23
ISC event902291
USGS-ANSSComCat
Local date27 December 1939 (1939-12-27)
Local time1:57:23 a.m.
Magnitude7.8 Mw [1]
Depth20 km (12 mi) [1]
Epicenter39°46′N 39°35′E / 39.77°N 39.58°E / 39.77; 39.58 [1]
FaultNorth Anatolian Fault
TypeStrike-slip
Areas affectedErzincan Province
Turkey
Total damage116,720 buildings were seriously damaged
Max. intensityXII (Extreme) [2]
Tsunami0.53 m (1 ft 9 in) [3]
AftershocksYes
Casualties32,700–32,968 dead [3]
100,000 injured [3]

The 1939 Erzincan earthquake hit the city of Erzincan in eastern Turkey on 27 December at 1:57:23 a.m. local time (11:57:23 p.m. 26 December UTC). with a magnitude of 7.8 Mw and a maximum Mercalli intensity of XII (Extreme). It was the second most powerful earthquake recorded in Turkey, equal to the 7.8 magnitude 2023 Turkey–Syria earthquakes. Only the 7.8–8.0 magnitude 1668 North Anatolia earthquake was more powerful.[4]

The earthquake was the deadliest in Turkey in the 20th century, with 32,700–32,968 dead and about 100,000 injured.[3] On the same day, the temperature was −30 °C (−22 °F), which caused many survivors of the earthquake to die from hypothermia.

The earthquake seriously damaged or destroyed 116,720 buildings. The city was almost completely destroyed. After the earthquake, there were several aftershocks which lasted for many months.

References[change | change source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 ISC (2015), ISC-GEM Global Instrumental Earthquake Catalogue (1900–2009), Version 2.0, International Seismological Centre
  2. National Geophysical Data Center / World Data Service (NGDC/WDS) (1972), Significant Earthquake Database, National Geophysical Data Center, NOAA, doi:10.7289/V5TD9V7K
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 USGS (September 4, 2009), PAGER-CAT Earthquake Catalog, Version 2008_06.1, United States Geological Survey
  4. "Historic Worldwide Earthquakes". United States Geological Survey. Archived from the original on 25 August 2009. Retrieved 27 September 2021.