Bermuda triangle

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The Bermuda triangle

The Bermuda Triangle, sometimes called the Devil's Triangle, is an area in the western part of the North Atlantic Ocean.

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Some people think this is because of paranormal or extraterrestrial beings.[1] Many of the incidents were false.[2][3][4] Some people believe that insurance companies charge higher premiums for shipping in this area, but that is not true.[2]-

Aircraft. On December 5, 1945 a US Navy flight of five Torpedo Bombers on a navigation exercise became lost; likewise a PBM patrol plane on the search for the missing aircraft was lost due to an explosion of unknown cause.[5].[6][7][8]

On 30 January 1948 BSAA G-AHNP "Star Tiger" was lost due to unknown causes while flying from Lisbon, Portugal to Bermuda. Among those missing was retired RAF Air Marshal Sir Arthur Coningham[9]. The Fantasy Fiction series The Twilight Zone has a Feb 24, 1961 episode "The Odyssey of Flight 33" which is a retelling of The Flying Dutchman legend in which this version is of a airligher trapped in a Time Vortex; among one of the passengers is a unnamed RAF general officer presumedly based on Air Marshal Coningham.

On 28 December 1948 a DC-3 was lost on a nighttime flight due to unknown causes between San Juan Puerto Rico to Miami Florida[10]. Presumedly this accident could have inspired The Fantasy Fiction series The Twilight Zone has a Sept 22, 1961 episode "The Arrival" which is also a retelling of The Flying Dutchman legend in which a DC-3 plane without crew or passengers lands at a airport; it is ultimately shown to be a hallucination of an insane FAA investigator who is obsessed with trying to solve the mystery of a missing DC-3 which vanished nearly 17 years over the sea in a flight from Buffalo New York.

A second BSAA G-AGRE "Star Ariel" was also lost 17 January 1949 due to unknown causes between Bermuda and Kingston Jamaica[11]

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Ships. According to Legend a sailing ship the "Ellen Austin" found a derelict vessel and placed a crew to sail the vessel to port. Two versions of what happened to the vessel are: the vessel was either lost in a storm or was found again without a crew. Lawrence David Kusche author of "The Bermuda Triangle Mystery-Solved" found no mention in 1880 or 1881 newspapers of this alleged incident-he did trace the legend to a book by Rupert Gould "The Stargazer Talks" published in 1943. The "Ellen Austin" did exist; although one website includes the alleged derelict vessel incident it does find that Rupert Gould talked about the legend on radio in the 1930s[12]; likewise the website traces the derelict story to a June 1906 newspaper story-which claims the derelict ship incident took place in 1891-[13]however the 1906 story does not give a reference of where this story came from!

According to Legend a U.S. Navy collier USS Cyclops {AC-4} was lost without trace in March 1918 with about the loss of 306 persons. Circumstantial evidence uncovered by two separate researchers is that the missing ship was lost due to a storm March 10, 1918. The first appeared in "Popular Science" June 1929 article by Alfred P. Reck "Strangest American Sea Mystery is Solved at Last" [14]; nearly 50 years later Lawrence David Kusche author of "The Bermuda Triangle Mystery Solved" found a report that a navy diver may have accidently found the missing vessel off Cape Charles Virginia in 1968[15] and also evidence of the storm of March 9/10, 1918.

Related pages[change | change source]

References[change | change source]

  1. Cochran-Smith, Marilyn (2003). "Bermuda Triangle: dichotomy, mythology, and amnesia". Journal of Teacher Education 54 (4): 275. doi:10.1177/0022487103256793. 
  2. 2.0 2.1 "Bermuda Triangle". History.navy.mil. 2003-07-13. Retrieved 2011-10-27. 
  3. "Bermuda Triangle". History.navy.mil. 1996-05-12. Retrieved 2011-10-27. 
  4. "USCG: Frequently Asked Questions". Uscg.mil. 2008-07-22. Retrieved 2011-10-27. 
  5. "HyperWar: Findings of the Board of Investigation Into the Loss of Flight 19 (Bermuda Triangle)". www.ibiblio.org. Retrieved 2017-07-17. 
  6. Tom Downs (2012-07-31), Flight 19 Johnson, retrieved 2017-07-21 
  7. "Flight 19". www.history.navy.mil. Retrieved 2017-07-17. 
  8. Note: A TBM wreck which happened in 1947 & is not connected to Flight 19 is at "TBM-3 Avenger (BuNo:53118)". AeroQuest. Retrieved 2017-12-11. 
  9. "Arthur Coningham (RAF officer)" (in en). Wikipedia. 2017-12-13. https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Arthur_Coningham_(RAF_officer)&oldid=815145801. 
  10. "1948 Airborne Transport DC-3 (DST) disappearance" (in en). Wikipedia. 2017-12-28. https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=1948_Airborne_Transport_DC-3_(DST)_disappearance&oldid=817386974. 
  11. "BSAA Star Ariel disappearance" (in en). Wikipedia. 2017-12-31. https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=BSAA_Star_Ariel_disappearance&oldid=817986836. 
  12. Sometimes Interesting (2015-12-10). "The Ellen Austin Encounter". Sometimes Interesting. Retrieved 2017-07-17. 
  13. Sometimes Interesting (2015-12-10). "The Ellen Austin Encounter". Sometimes Interesting. Retrieved 2017-07-17. 
  14. Corporation, Bonnier (1929-06). Popular Science. Bonnier Corporation.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  15. "Cyclops | National Underwater and Marine Agency". www.numa.net. Retrieved 2017-07-17.