Black power movement

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Black Power movement
Part of the aftermath of
the civil rights movement
Black Panther convention2.jpg
Black Panther at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, June 1970
Date1960–1980s
Location
United States
Caused by
Resulted in
  • Worldwide spread of Black Power ideals
  • Establishment of Black-operated services and businesses
  • Decline by the 1980s

The Black Power movement was a social movement supported by African-Americans who wanted safety and support in African American neighborhoods, Black Power activists founded Black-owned bookstores, food cooperatives, farms, media, printing presses, schools, clinics and ambulance services.[1][2][3][4][5][6] The international impact of the movement includes the Black Power Revolution in Trinidad and Tobago.[7]

By the late 1960s, Black Power became violent to fight against American white supremacy. Most of these ideas were inspired by Malcolm X's criticism of Martin Luther King Jr.'s peaceful protest methods.[8]

References[change | change source]

  1. Davis, Joshua Clark (January 28, 2017). "Black-Owned Bookstores: Anchors of the Black Power Movement – AAIHS". Aaihs.org. Retrieved March 10, 2017.
  2. Konadu, Kwasi (January 1, 2009). A View from the East: Black Cultural Nationalism and Education in New York City. Syracuse University Press. ISBN 9780815651017.
  3. Klehr, Harvey (1988-01-01). Far Left of Center: The American Radical Left Today. Transaction Publishers. ISBN 9781412823432.
  4. "Black Power TV | Duke University Press". Dukeupress.edu. Retrieved March 11, 2017.
  5. "The Black Power movement and its schools | Cornell Chronicle". News.cornell.edu. Retrieved March 11, 2017.
  6. Nelson, Alondra (January 1, 2011). Body and Soul: The Black Panther Party and the Fight Against Medical Discrimination. U of Minnesota Press. ISBN 9781452933221.
  7. "Black Power Movement". Encyclopedia of African-American Culture and History. Encyclopedia.com. Retrieved January 14, 2018.
  8. "Malcolm X: From Nation of Islam to Black Power Movement". www.aljazeera.com. Retrieved 2020-04-24.