Black Soft-shell Turtle

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Black Soft-shell Turtle
Bostami turtle 3.jpg
Scientific classification e
Unrecognized taxon (fix): Nilssonia
Species:
Binomial name
Nilssonia nigricans
Synonyms[3][4]
  • Trionyx nigricans
    Anderson, 1875
  • Amyda nigricans
    Mertens, L. Müller & Rust, 1934
  • Aspideretes nigricans
    Meylan, 1987
  • Trionix nigricans
    Richard, 1999
  • Nilssonia nigricans
    Praschag et al., 2007
The side profile of an adult Bostami Turtle.

The black softshell turtle or Bostami turtle ,Nilssonia nigricans, is a species of freshwater turtle found in India (Assam) and Bangladesh (Chittagong and Sylhet). It was long believed to be inbred individuals of the Indian softshell turtle (A. gangeticus or N. gangeticus) or the Indian peacock softshell turtle (A. hurum or N. hurum), but later found to be a distinct species.[5]In the 1800s it was believed these turtles were brought from Iran to Chittagong shrine pond by Hazrat Bayezid Bostami. His turtles he had brought to this pond were treated as sacred and respected by the public[6]. Previously declared extinct by the International Union for Conservation of Nature in 2002, these turtles were found to still exist in a temple’s pond called the Hayagriva Madhava Temple located in Assam, India[7]. Through conservation methods and protection of the species, some of these turtles can be found today throughout the wild, and scientists and environmental biologists are continuing to work hard to preserve this endangered species and their natural habitat.

References[change | change source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 Template:Harnvb
  2. 2.0 2.1 IUCN Status report
  3. Fritz Uwe; Peter Havaš (2007). "Checklist of Chelonians of the World" (PDF). Vertebrate Zoology. 57 (2): 311. ISSN 1864-5755. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2011-05-01. Retrieved 29 May 2012.
  4. "Nilssonia nigricans ". The Reptile Database. www.reptile-database.org.
  5. Praschag et al. (2007)
  6. "'Bostami turtle' found in wild". The Daily Star. 13 July 2020.
  7. Weston, Phoebe (11 June 2019). "Indian temple helps nurture 'extinct' turtle back to life". Independent.