Blackadder II

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Blackadder II
Created byRichard Curtis & Ben Elton
StarringRowan Atkinson
Tim McInnerny
Tony Robinson
Miranda Richardson
Stephen Fry
Patsy Byrne
Theme music composerHoward Goodall
Country of originUnited Kingdom
Original language(s)English
No. of episodes6
Production
Producer(s)John Lloyd
Running time30 minutes
Release
Original networkBBC One
Picture format4:3
Audio formatMono
Original release9 January – 20 February 1986
Chronology
Preceded byThe Black Adder
Followed byBlackadder the Third
External links
Website

Blackadder II is the second series of the BBC sitcom Blackadder. It was written by Richard Curtis and Ben Elton. It aired from 9 January to 20 February 1986. The series is set in England during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I (1558–1603). The main character, Edmund, Lord Blackadder is a Tudor courtier trying to win the favour of the Queen while avoiding the fate of many of her suitors.

The series had several from the format of The Black Adder. These changes were: Ben Elton replaced Rowan Atkinson as the second writer, it was made in studio sets, rather than on location, the introduction of the more familiar Machiavellian "Blackadder" character and a less intelligent Baldrick.[1]

Cast[change | change source]

The size of the main cast was smaller compared to the previous series. A fixed number of characters appeared in every episode.

The series also had at least one significant cameo role per episode. There were notable appearances from Rik Mayall, playing Lord Flashheart in "Bells", two figures famous for their roles in science fiction series - Tom Baker and Simon Jones - in "Potato", Miriam Margolyes, as the puritanical Lady Whiteadder, and Hugh Laurie appearing twice, first as the drunken Simon Partridge in "Beer" and in the final episode as the evil Prince Ludwig. Laurie was later given a larger role as George in the next two series.

References[change | change source]

  1. Lewisohn, Mark, Blackadder II at the former BBC Guide to Comedy, Retrieved 17 March 2007

Other websites[change | change source]