Chemical equation

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A chemical equation is a way to predict the way that two or more chemicals will work together. Using what chemists know about the way chemicals act, we add the letter symbols together just like a math problem. In this way we can correctly guess if we will get a new chemical when we mix two or more chemicals together, and what that chemical will be.

Chemical equations are either worded or written using the elements' symbols, how much of the element and in what state (solid[s], liquid[l], gas[g]) it is in.

For example: An aqueous (liquid) solution of Sodium Chloride (NaCl[aq]) and another aqueous solution of Silver Nitrate (AgNO3(aq)). These mixed together forms Sodium Nitrate (NaNO3(aq)) and Silver Chloride (AgCl(s))

Which in symbols is:

NaCl(aq) + AgNO3(aq) = NaNO3(aq) + AgCl(s)

The solutions formed a solid named AgCl. This formation can be called a precipitate and the reaction between the two solutions a precipitation reaction, because the solid produced is not dissolved, whereas all the other products are dissolved.

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