Chipko Movement

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The Chipko movement was a group action in India with the goal of saving trees. This is mainly done through the act of hugging trees to protect them from being cut down.[1] It was also known as Chipko Andolan. Those who were part of it used nonviolent protests. The Chipko movement began in the early 1970s in Uttarakhand. It then spread to Uttar Pradesh. By the 1980s it had spread across most of India.[2]

The Chipko movement lead to a change in policies to stop the clearcutting of trees in some regions.[3] (Clearcutting is a type of logging where all trees in an area are cut down).

References[change | change source]

  1. "What is the Chipko movement?". The Indian Express. 26 March 2018. Retrieved 13 December 2019.
  2. "Unasylva - No. 146 - Women in forestry - Standing up for trees: Women's role in the Chipko Movement". www.fao.org. Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. Retrieved 13 December 2019.
  3. The women of Chipko Staying alive: women, ecology, and development, by Vandana Shiva, Published by Zed Books, 1988. ISBN 0-86232-823-3. Page 67.