Chosen-plaintext attack

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A chosen-plaintext attack (CPA) is a model for cryptanalysis which assumes that the attacker can choose random plaintexts to be encrypted and obtain the corresponding ciphertexts. The goal of the attack is to gain some further information which reduces the security of the encryption scheme. In the worst case, a chosen-plaintext attack could expose secret information after calculating the secret key.

Modern cryptography, is implemented in software or hardware and is used for a diverse range of applications; for many applications, a chosen-plaintext attack is often very feasible. Chosen-plaintext attacks become extremely important in the context of public key cryptography, where the encryption key is public and attackers can encrypt any plaintext they choose.

Any cipher that can prevent chosen-plaintext attacks is then also guaranteed to be secure against known-plaintext and ciphertext-only attacks; this is a conservative approach to security.

Two forms of chosen-plaintext attack can be distinguished:

  • Batch chosen-plaintext attack, where the cryptanalyst chooses all plaintexts before any of them are encrypted. This is an unprofessional use of "chosen-plaintext attack".
  • Adaptive chosen-plaintext attack, where the professional cryptanalyst makes a series of interactive queries, choosing subsequent plaintexts based on the information from the previous encryptions.

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