Dark web

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The dark web is the world wide web content that exists on darknets. These are overlay networks which use the public internet but need specific software, configurations or authorization to access.[1][2] The dark web is a small part of the deep web. The deep web is the part of the web not accessed by search engines. Sometimes the term "deep web" is wrongly used to refer to the dark web only.[3][4][5][6][7]

The dark web includes small, friend-to-friend peer-to-peer networks, as well as large networks like Freenet, I2P, and Tor. Users of the dark web refer to the regular web as the clearnet because it is not encrypted.[8] The Tor dark web may be referred to as onionland,[9]

References[change | change source]

  1. Greenberg, Andy (2014). "Hacker Lexicon: What is the dark web?". Wired. Retrieved 27 August 2015.
  2. Egan, Matt (2015). "What is the dark web? How to access the dark web - How to turn out the lights and access the dark web (and why you might want to)". Retrieved 18 June 2015.
  3. Solomon, Jane (6 May 2015). "The Deep Web vs. The dark web". Retrieved 26 May 2015.
  4. Greenberg, Andy (19 November 2014). "Hacker Lexicon: What Is the dark web?". Wired. Retrieved 6 June 2015."Clearing Up Confusion – Deep Web vs. dark web". BrightPlanet.
  5. NPR Staff (25 May 2014). "Going Dark: The Internet Behind The Internet". Retrieved 29 May 2015.
  6. The dark web Revealed. Popular Science. . pages 20-21
  7. Greenberg, Andy (19 November 2014). "Hacker Lexicon: What Is the dark web?". Wired. Retrieved 6 June 2015.
  8. "Clearnet vs hidden services – why you should be careful". DeepDotWeb. Retrieved 4 June 2015.
  9. Chacos, Brad (12 August 2013). "Meet Darknet, the hidden, anonymous underbelly of the searchable Web". Retrieved 16 August 2015.