Dialetheism

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Dialetheism is the view that some statements can be both true and false at the same time.[1] It is the opposite of the law of noncontradiction (LNC). Because of this dialetheism is completely opposite of what most philosophers call common sense.[1] Graham Priest defines it as believing there can be true contradictions.[2] Priest gives as an example the liar paradox (or liar's paradox).[3] If someone says "everything I say is a lie", then is the statement true or false? In this paradox it can be both.

References[change | change source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 "Dialetheism". Metaphysics Research Lab. Retrieved 7 March 2015.
  2. Whittle, Bruno. "Dialetheism, logical consequence and hierarchy." Analysis Vol. 64 Issue 4 (2004): 318-326.
  3. Priest, Graham (28 November 2010). "Paradoxical Truth". The New York Times. Retrieved 7 March 2015.