Drug withdrawal

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Withdrawal
Classification and external resources
ICD-10F10..3-F19..3
ICD-9292.0
eMedicinearticle/819502
MeSHD013375

Drug withdrawal is the group of symptoms that occur upon the fast discontinuation or decrease in intake of medications or recreational drugs.[1]

In order to experience the symptoms of withdrawal, one must have first developed a form of drug addiction, which may occur as physical dependence, psychological dependence, or both.

Mental effects of withdrawal[change | change source]

Anger: Because many marijuana users smoke as a means of escaping from difficult emotions, they don’t know how to regulate those emotions naturally. The anger during withdrawal can range from a steady, mild stream of rage to a sudden and volatile outburst. These can stem from feelings of anxiety and a general lack of emotional control during the first few days of withdrawing, which results in swaying back and forth between anger and euphoria. However, these unbalanced emotions often regulate themselves naturally within three months.

Insomnia: One of the most commonly reported symptoms associated with marijuana withdrawal is insomnia. This can range from a handful of consecutive sleepless nights to occasional sleepless nights over the course of several months.

Nightmares: Nightmares and other forms of vivid dreams are also common in the later stages of withdrawal. They typically start about a week after last use and last anywhere from a week to a month.[2]

References[change | change source]

  1. Alexander, GC; Sayla MA; Holmes HM; Sachs GA (11 April 2006). "Prioritizing and stopping prescription medicines". Canadian Medical Association Journal. 8. 174 (8): 1083–1084. doi:10.1503/cmaj.050837. PMC 1421477. PMID 16606954. Retrieved 2011-11-11.
  2. September 16, Last updated on; 2020. "How Long Does Marijuana Withdrawal Last?". Withdrawal. Retrieved 2020-11-11.CS1 maint: numeric names: authors list (link)