Eczema

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Eczema (from Greek ēkzema, "to boil over") is a form of dermatitis, or inflammation of the epidermis. The epidermis is the outer layer of the skin.

Eczema is a skin disease that makes your skin red and become irritated. Eczema can last for a most of a person's life. The person's skin may start to fall off. The person may get a rash, and skin may ooze fluids (liquid will come out from the area). If a person has eczema, the person's skin might itch and turn a lighter color in the area. Eczema is common on the backs of knees. It is also most common during the winter.

There are three different kinds of eczema: atopic, contact dermatitis, and neurodermatitis. No kind of Eczema is contagious. If a person's relatives have Eczema, that person is more likely to have it, too. Some foods or medicines can start eczema. There are medicines that can help eczema hurt less. Eczema can be treated with lotions and ointments.[1][2] Bathing with hot water will make Eczema rashes worse.

References[change | change source]

  1. Lynfield, Yelva Liptzin. "Eczema." World Book Advanced. World Book, 2016. Web. 22 Feb. 2016.
  2. RelayHealth. “Eczema: brief version.” Health and Wellness. Gale Cengage learning, Feb. 2012. 22 Feb. 2016.