Haiku (operating system)

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Haiku (initially OpenBeOS) is an open source operating system in development aimed at personal desktop computing and inspired by Be Inc.'s BeOS. It is designed to be fast and easy to use.[1] Haiku is written in C++[2] and uses a kernel based on the NewOS kernel.[3][4][5] Haiku is licensed under the MIT License.[6][2]

Haiku uses the Be File System (BFS). Features of this filesystem include a 64-bit address space, journaling, and extensible attributes.[7] Haiku's version of the BFS is optimized for speed and performance.[8]

Michael Phipps started the Haiku project in 2001 as Palm, Inc. was purchasing Be, Inc..[9][10] In 2003, Phipps founded the non-profit Haiku, Inc. in order to support Haiku and its development.[11][12][10]

References[change | change source]

  1. "What is Haiku?". haiku-os.org. Retrieved January 18, 2013.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Paul, Ryan (February 12, 2008). "First look: Haiku poetically resurrects BeOS". Ars Technica. Retrieved January 18, 2013.
  3. Reimer, Jeremy (January 8, 2013). "1998’s most intriguing OS, 15 years later: Hands-on with Haiku alpha 4". Ars Technica. Retrieved January 18, 2013.
  4. Loli, Eugenia (November 25, 2001). "Travis Geiselbrecht on NewOS and the Future of BeOS". OSNews. p. 2. Retrieved January 18, 2013.
  5. Loli, Eugenia (June 2, 2002). "Travis Geiselbrecht on NewOS and the Future of BeOS". OSNews. Retrieved January 18, 2013.
  6. "General FAQ". haiku-os.org. Retrieved January 18, 2013.
  7. Hudson, Andrew (2010-0603). "The BeOS file system: an OS geek retrospective". Ars Technica. Retrieved January 17, 2013. Check date values in: |date= (help)
  8. Hudson, Andrew (2010-0603). "The BeOS file system: an OS geek retrospective". Ars Technica. p. 3. Retrieved January 17, 2013. Check date values in: |date= (help)
  9. "Project History". haiku-os.org. Retrieved January 18, 2013.
  10. 10.0 10.1 Leavengood, Ryan (2012-05). "The Dawn of Haiku OS". IEEE Spectrum. p. 2. Retrieved January 18, 2013. Check date values in: |date= (help)
  11. "Haiku, Inc". haiku-os.org. Retrieved January 18, 2013.
  12. "Purpose". haiku-inc.org. Retrieved January 18, 2013.

Other websites[change | change source]