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Herschel Greer Stadium

Coordinates: 36°8′36″N 86°46′25″W / 36.14333°N 86.77361°W / 36.14333; -86.77361
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Greer Stadium
A view from the right field line of the seating bowl at Greer. Blue seats stretch from the right field wall, behind home plate, and beyond the third base dugout.
A view of the stadium from the right field seats
Map
Full nameHerschel Greer Stadium
Location534 Chestnut Street
Nashville, Tennessee
United States
Coordinates36°8′36″N 86°46′25″W / 36.14333°N 86.77361°W / 36.14333; -86.77361
OwnerNashville Metro Government
Capacity10,300 (fixed seating)[3]
15,000 (plus standing room)
Record attendance22,315 (August 18, 1982; Nashville Sounds vs. Columbus Astros)[4]
Field sizeLeft field: 327 ft (100 m)
Left-center field: 375 ft (114 m)
Center field: 400 ft (120 m)
Right-center field: 375 ft (114 m)
Right field: 327 ft (100 m)[5]
SurfaceGrass
Construction
StartedAugust 26, 1977[1]
OpenedApril 26, 1978
ClosedAugust 27, 2014
Demolished2019
Construction cost$1.5 million
($6.23 million in 2021 dollars[2])
Tenants
Nashville Sounds (SL/AA/PCL) 1978–2014
Belmont Bruins (NAIA/NCAA) 1979–2010
Nashville Xpress (SL) 1993–1994

Herschel Greer Stadium was a baseball park in Nashville, Tennessee.[6] It was the home stadium of the Nashville Sounds, who are a Minor League Baseball team. It opened on April 26, 1978.[6] The Sounds played there for 37 years. Their last game was on August 27, 2014.[6] In 2015, the Sounds began to play at a new stadium called First Horizon Park.[6] Greer Stadium was demolished to become part of a park in 2019.[7]

The ballpark was built for the the Nashville Sounds, but other sports teams have also played at the stadium. Another baseball team, the Nashville Xpress, played there in 1993 and 1994 at the same time as the Sounds.[8] The stadium was famous for having a scoreboard shaped like a guitar.[9]

References[change | change source]

Specific

  1. Coons, Ron (June 4, 1978). "Nashville, A Lesson for Louisville?". The Courier-Journal. Louisville. p. C1. Archived from the original on April 29, 2019 – via Newspapers.com.
  2. 1634–1699: McCusker, J. J. (1997). How Much Is That in Real Money? A Historical Price Index for Use as a Deflator of Money Values in the Economy of the United States: Addenda et Corrigenda (PDF). American Antiquarian Society. 1700–1799: McCusker, J. J. (1992). How Much Is That in Real Money? A Historical Price Index for Use as a Deflator of Money Values in the Economy of the United States (PDF). American Antiquarian Society. 1800–present: Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis. "Consumer Price Index (estimate) 1800–". Retrieved April 16, 2022.
  3. "2014 Nashville Sounds Media Guide" (PDF). Nashville Sounds. Minor League Baseball. 2014. p. 196. Archived (PDF) from the original on April 3, 2015. Retrieved February 21, 2019.
  4. Traughber 2017, p. 182.
  5. "Ground Rules". Nashville Sounds. Minor League Baseball. Archived from the original on January 23, 2013. Retrieved February 20, 2019.
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 6.3 "Nashville Sounds Team History". Nashville Sounds. Minor League Baseball. Retrieved May 11, 2020.
  7. Lombard, Cherish (April 1, 2019). "Greer Stadium Demolition Could Take up to 6 Months, Officials Say". WRKN. Retrieved April 2, 2019.
  8. Weiss, Bill; Wright, Marshall (2001). "Historians Weiss, Wright Rank 100 Best Minor League Baseball Teams". Minor League Baseball. Archived from the original on January 5, 2009. Retrieved March 31, 2009.
  9. Straughn, Katie (June 20, 2014). "7 Facts About Greer Stadium's Original Guitar Scoreboard". The Tennessean. Nashville. Archived from the original on April 4, 2015. Retrieved May 16, 2018.

General

  • Traughber, Bill (2017). Nashville Baseball History: From Sulphur Dell to the Sounds. South Orange, New Jersey: Summer Games Books. ISBN 978-1-938545-83-2.

Other websites[change | change source]