Icosane

From Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Icosane
Names
IUPAC name
Icosane[1]
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
Beilstein Reference 1700722
ChEBI
ChEMBL
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.003.653
EC Number
  • 204-018-1
MeSH eicosane
UNII
  • CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC
Properties
C20H42
Molar mass 282.56 g·mol−1
Appearance Colorless, waxy crystals
Odor Odorless
Melting point 36 to 38 °C; 97 to 100 °F; 309 to 311 K
Boiling point 343.1 °C; 649.5 °F; 616.2 K
log P 10.897
kH 31 μmol Pa−1 kg−1
Thermochemistry
Standard molar
entropy
So298
558.6 J K−1 mol−1
Specific heat capacity, C 602.5 J K−1 mol−1 (at 6.0 °C)
Hazards
NFPA 704

NFPA 704.svg

1
0
0
 
Flash point > 113 °C (235 °F; 386 K)
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
☒N verify (what is checkY☒N ?)
Infobox references

Icosane, also commonly spelled eicosane, is an alkaline hydrocarbon with the chemical formula H20C42.[2][3] It has 366,319 structural isomers. Its high flash point makes it a very inefficient fuel, so it is not much use in the petrochemical industry.[4] However, an isomer of icosane, n-Icosane (the straight-chain structural isomer of icosane) is the shortest compound found in paraffin waxes (CnH2n+2, where ) used to form candles. Icosane's phase transition at a moderate temperature makes it a candidate for PCM, which is used to store thermal energy and control temperature.

Icosane is a non-polar molecule: quite unreactive except when it burns (see the NFPA Diamond in the infobox). It is also way less dense than insoluble in water. This also means it shares properties with its smaller alkaline counterparts.

Icosane can also be detected in the body odor of people diagnosed with Parkinson's Disease.[4]

The compound is found in the highest concentrations in plants such as Mexican ageratum, licorice, and the Bayrum tree.[5]

References[change | change source]

  1. "eicosane - Compound Summary". PubChem Compound. USA: National Center for Biotechnology Information. 16 September 2004. Identification and Related Records. Retrieved 4 January 2012.
  2. PubChem. "Eicosane". pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov. Retrieved 2021-05-20.
  3. "PDBeChem: Ligand Dictionary (PDB Ligand Chemistry - chemical component dictionary)". www.ebi.ac.uk. Retrieved 2021-06-03.
  4. 4.0 4.1 "icosane (CHEBI:43619)". www.ebi.ac.uk. Retrieved 2021-05-20.
  5. "Activities of a Specific Chemical Query". web.archive.org. 2015-09-23. Retrieved 2021-05-21.