Juvenile idiopathic arthritis

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Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (which is also called juvenile rheumatoid arthritis) is a condition which affects people ages 16 and under. The problem consists of excess swelling around joints in the knees, ankles, wrists, hands and feet. Symptoms consists of lethargy, strong pain and reduced physical activity. There is also stiffness in the morning which may improve later on during the day. Juvenile arthritis is an autoimmune disease. More boys than girls are affected and treatment includes pain-killers, physiotherapy and in extreme cases gold injections. It is not usually considered life-threatening but in 1976 a girl of 5 years was prescribed with steroids at Great Ormond Street Hospital to lessen her acute arthritic pain and died at home on 30th December after a swift attack of encephalitis. Her Death Certificate gives the cause of death as 'Still's Disease' a form of Juvenile idiopathic arthritis.