Kivitoo

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Kivitoo
Abandoned settlement
Kivitoo is located in Nunavut
Kivitoo
Kivitoo
Coordinates: 67°57′00″N 64°55′00″W / 67.95000°N 64.91667°W / 67.95000; -64.91667Coordinates: 67°57′00″N 64°55′00″W / 67.95000°N 64.91667°W / 67.95000; -64.91667
CountryCanada
TerritoryNunavut
RegionQikiqtaaluk Region
Highest elevation
313 m (1,027 ft)
Population
 (2006)
 • Total0
Time zoneUTC-5 (EST)
 • Summer (DST)UTC-4 (EDT)

Kivitoo was an Inuit community. It was also a whaling station.[1] It was on the northeast shore of Baffin Island in Nunavut, Canada. The Inuit families that lived in Kivitoo moved to Qikiqtarjuaq in the 1950s.[2] Qikiqtarjuaq is 31 mi (50 km) south of Kivitoo.

History[change | change source]

In the 20th century, the Sabellum Trading Company created a whaling post at Kivitoo. This was to help the whalers that would stop there. The post was abandoned in 1926.[1]

Kivitoo was a Distant Early Warning Line site. It's code was FOX-D. Right now, it is a North Warning System site. A short airstrip was built near Kivitoo around the time it became a Distant Early Warning Line site.[3] The people that were living in Kivitoo were moved to Qikiqtarjuaq in the 1950s by the Canadian government. This was supposed to be for their safety because three people that lived in Kivitoo were killed when ice broke under their igloos.[4] The people never came back to Kivitoo. The government had already demolished most of the buildings in Kivitoo.[4]

A documentary that was made by Zacharias Kunuk talked about Kivitoo. It is called Kivitoo: What They Thought of Us.[4]

References[change | change source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 Grant, Shelagh D. "Niaqutiaq". Dictionary of Canadian Biography. Retrieved 4 November 2018.
  2. "Qikiqtarjuaq". Qikiqtani Inuit Association. Archived from the original on 30 March 2017. Retrieved 4 November 2018.
  3. Allinson, Martin. "Site: FOX-D". The DEWLine. Retrieved 4 November 2018.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 Ottenhof, Luke (19 October 2018). "Over 50 years ago, tragedy struck this Nunavut community. Zacharias Kunuk's new film wants answers". CBC Arts. Retrieved 4 November 2018.

Other websites[change | change source]