Laura Chinchilla

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Laura Chincilla
Laura-Chinchilla-cropped.jpg
Coat of arms of Costa Rica.svgPresident of Costa Rica
In office
8 May 2010 – 8 May 2014
Vice President Alfio Piva
Preceded by Óscar Arias
Succeeded by Luis Guillermo Solís
Personal details
Born Laura Chinchilla Miranda
28 March 1959 (1959-03-28) (age 57)
Flag of Costa Rica.svgSan José, Costa Rica
Political party National Liberation Party
Spouse(s) José María Rico (m. 2000)
Children 1 son
Alma mater University of Costa Rica
Georgetown University

Laura Chinchilla Miranda (born 28 March 1959)[1] served as the President of Costa Rica from 2010 to 2014. She is Costa Rica's first female president. She is the sixth woman to be elected president of a Latin American country. She was one of Óscar Arias Sánchez's two vice presidents. She was his administration's Minister of Justice.[2] She was the governing PLN candidate for President in the 2010 general election. She won with 46.76% of the vote.[3]

Personal life[change | change source]

Chinchilla was born in Carmen Central, San José in 1959. Her father was Rafael Ángel Chinchilla Fallas. He was a former comptroller of Costa Rica.[source?] Her mother was Emilce Miranda Castillo. She married Mario Alberto Madrigal Díaz on 23 January 1982 and divorced on 22 May 1985. She had a son in 1996 with José María Rico Cueto, a Spanish lawyer who has a Canadian citizenship; Chinchilla married him on 26 March 2000.[4]

Political career[change | change source]

Chinchilla graduated from the University of Costa Rica. She received her master's degree in public policy from Georgetown University.[5][6] Before politics, Chinchilla worked as a NGO consultant in Latin America and Africa. She specialized in judicial reform and public security. She served in the José María Figueres Olsen administration as vice-minister for public security (1994–1996) and minister of public security (1996–1998).

From 2002 to 2006, she served in the National Assembly as a deputy for the province of San José.[7]

Chinchilla was one of two vice-presidents elected under the second Arias administration (2006–2010). She resigned the vice-presidency in 2008 in order to prepare her run for the presidency in 2010. On 7 June 2009 she won the Partido Liberación Nacional (PLN) primary with a 15% margin over her nearest rival, and was thus endorsed as the party's presidential candidate.

Her term ended in 8 May 2014.

References[change | change source]

  1. de Miguel, Veronica (14 August 2012). "Laura Chinchilla: Is honesty enough for Costa Rica?". VOXXI. http://www.voxxi.com/laura-chinchilla-costa-rica/. Retrieved 15 December 2012.
  2. "Chiefs of State and Cabinet members of Foreign Governments". The Central Intelligence Agency of America. https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/world-leaders-1/world-leaders-c/costa-rica.html. Retrieved 22 February 2010.
  3. "2010 Presidential election results" (in Spanish). Supreme Court of Elections. 8 February 2010. http://www.tse.go.cr/elecciones2010/presidente.htm. Retrieved 22 February 2010.
  4. "Costa Rican electoral register (name search)". Tribunal Supremo de Elecciones, República de Costa Rica. 8 May 2010. http://www.tse.go.cr/consulta_persona/consulta_nombres.aspx. Retrieved 8 May 2010.
  5. "Costa Rica elects first female president, Georgetown grad Laura Chinchilla". Vox Populi, Georgetown's blog of record. 8 February 2010. http://blog.georgetownvoice.com/2010/02/08/costa-rica-elects-first-female-president-georgetown-grad-laura-chinchilla. Retrieved 22 February 2010.
  6. "Costa Rica elects first woman president, inspiring the region". The Christian Science Monitor. 8 February 2010. http://www.csmonitor.com/World/Americas/2010/0208/Costa-Rica-elects-first-woman-president-inspiring-the-region. Retrieved 22 February 2010.
  7. "Laura Chinchilla Miranda's curriculum vitae on her Facebook page". Laura Chinchilla Miranda. http://www.facebook.com/note.php?note_id=49192216499. Retrieved 2010-05-09.