Manuscript

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Christ Pantocrator seated in a capital "U" in a manuscript from the Badische Landesbibliothek, Germany.

A manuscript is any document that is written by hand, not printed or made in some other way. The early history of writing is intimately connected with the history of writing materials, of which the manuscript is one. Early printing made use of many ideas which developed in the era of manuscripts.A manuscript (abbreviated MS for singular and MSS for plural) was, traditionally, any document that is written by hand — or, once practical typewriters became available, typewritten — as opposed to being mechanically printed or reproduced in some indirect or automated way.[1] More recently, the term has come to be understood to further include any written, typed, or word-processed copy of an author's work, as distinguished from its rendition as a printed version of the same.[2] Before the arrival of printing, all documents and books were manuscripts. Manuscripts are not defined by their contents, which may combine writing with mathematical calculations, maps, explanatory figures or illustrations. Manuscripts may be in book form, scrolls or in codex format. Illuminated manuscripts are enriched with pictures, border decorations, elaborately embossed initial letters or full-page illustrations. A document should be at least 75 years old to be considered a manuscript.[3]