Matterhorn

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Matterhorn
German: Matterhorn, Italian: Cervino, French: Le Cervin
Matterhorn from Domhütte - 2.jpg
East and north faces of the Matterhorn
Highest point
Elevation 4,478 m (14,692 ft)
Prominence 1042 m ↓ Col Durand [note 1]
Isolation 13.8 km → Liskamm-West Top [note 2]
Parent peak Weisshorn
Listing Alpine four-thousanders
Great north faces of the Alps
Coordinates 45°58′35.0″N 7°39′31.0″E / 45.976389°N 7.658611°E / 45.976389; 7.658611Coordinates: 45°58′35.0″N 7°39′31.0″E / 45.976389°N 7.658611°E / 45.976389; 7.658611[1]
Naming
Translation Peak of the Meadows[2]
Geography
Matterhorn is located in Alps
Matterhorn
Matterhorn
Location in the Alps
Location
Parent range Pennine Alps
Topo map swisstopo 1347 Matterhorn
Climbing
First ascent
Easiest route Hörnli ridge (AD, rock/mixed climb)

The Matterhorn (in German; Italian: Cervino, French: Mont Cervin or Le Cervin) is perhaps the most familiar mountain in the European Alps.[3] Its height is 4,478 metres.[4]

The mountain is on the border between Switzerland and Italy, it towers over the Swiss village of Zermatt and the Italian village Breuil-Cervinia in the Val Tournanche. The name of the mountain comes from the German words Matte, meaning valley or meadow, and Horn, which means peak.[5]

References[change | change source]

  1. Federal Office of Topography – swisstopo. Matterhorn peak [map], digital edition, 1:10 0000, National Map 1:10'000. Retrieved on 2018-01-23.
  2. Arnold Lunn, Matterhorn Centenary, Allen & Unwin, 1965 (p. 25)
  3. Even though the Matterhorn is very famous, both because of its beauty, and because it is hard to climb, it is not one of the 100 tallest mountains in the Alps. Several mountains near it, including Monte Rosa, the Dom, Liskamm and the Weisshorn, are taller.
  4. NHK, "Matterhorn: Majestic Peak that Pierces the Sky -- Switzerland, 4,478 m"; retrieved 2012-5-24.
  5. Swiss Mountains - Names www.swissworld.org Retrieved 26 November 2007.
  • Charles Gos, Le Cervin (Attinger, 1948)
  • Edward Whymper, Scrambles Amongst the Alps (1871)

Notes

  1. Despite its prominence in a local sense, the Matterhorn is not among the top 100 mountains in the Alps measured by topographic prominence. Its close neighbors Monte Rosa, the Dom, Liskamm and the Weisshorn, have higher summits. See a panoramic photograph of the view from Finsteraarhorn, to the north. The key col is Col Durand, at 3,436 metres (11,273 ft), between the Matterhorn and the Weisshorn.
  2. Retrieved from Google Earth. The nearest point of higher elevation is the Western Liskamm.

Other websites[change | change source]