Mirin

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A bowl filled with mirin

Mirin (味醂, みりん) is a common ingredient (or stuff) in Japanese cooking.

The term "Mirin" is a general name that resembles a close taste for cooking purpose. But there are two types. One is a traditional type called "本みりん", which was developed a hundred years ago.[1] It is produced almost all from rice, kōji and alcohol. During brewing process, about 14 % of alcohol is included, so that it protects mirin from going bad or spoiling.[1] In fact sugar is not added to it. Mirin is a kind of rice wine similar to sake.[2] Sweetness comes from its brewing process.[2][3]

The other is a fake of 本みりん, often called "みりん風調味料", which hardly contains alcohol and adds sugar and broth instead.[4] It is 40%–50% sugar.[5] Thus, new type is usually sold much cheaper in market. This kind of Mirin contain less alcohol.[6][2]

In Kansai style cooking, mirin is boiled for a short time. This removes some of the alcohol. Kansai-style boiled mirin is called nikiri mirin (煮切り味醂).[7]But usually it is boiled enough to take alcohl away in cooking.

Mirin is used in teriyaki sauce, too.[8]Mirin is popular and widely used for Japanese dishes.[9]

References[change | change source]


  1. 1.0 1.1 "本みりんを知ろう | 全国本みりん協議会". これらのお酒は腐敗しやすかったので、腐敗防止策として焼酎が加えられました。
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 "本みりんの知識|全国味淋協会". 全国味淋協会 (in Japanese). Retrieved 2020-08-06.
  3. "み り ん". 熟成時に約14% 程度のアルコール分があるので,酵母菌によるアルコール発酵や雑菌の繁殖が抑えられている。
  4. "みりん・調味料についてのよくあるご質問". オエノングループ (in Japanese). Retrieved 2020-08-06.
  5. "Diversified uses of Mirin". Taiwan News. Archived from the original on 2009-01-06. Retrieved 2009-01-07.
  6. Shimbo, Hiroko; Shimbo Beitchman (2000). The Japanese Kitchen: 250 Recipes in a Traditional Spirit. Ming Tsai. Harvard Common Press. p. 75. ISBN 978-1-5583-2177-9. Retrieved 2009-01-06.
  7. Tsuji, Shizuo; Mary Sutherland, Ruth Reichl and Yoshiki Tsuji (2007). Japanese Cooking: A Simple Art. Kodansha International. p. 219. ISBN 978-4-77003-049-8. Retrieved 2009-01-07.
  8. Shimbo, Hiroko; Shimbo Beitchman (2000). The Japanese Kitchen: 250 Recipes in a Traditional Spirit. Ming Tsai. Harvard Common Press. p. 77. ISBN 978-1-5583-2177-9. Retrieved 2009-01-06.
  9. "本みりんの知識|全国味淋協会". 全国味淋協会 (in Japanese). Retrieved 2020-08-06.
  10. "Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST)".