Mount Salak

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Mount Salak (Indonesian: Gunung Salak, Sundanese: Gunung Salak) is an eroded volcano in West Java, Indonesia. Several satellite cones occur on the southeastern flank and in the northern pass. Two craters are located at the top. The mount has been a site of geothermal exploration.

Mount Salak
MT. SALAK - INDONESIA - 2019.jpg
Mount Salak as seen from Caringin District, Bogor Regency
Highest point
Elevation2,211 m (7,254 ft)[1]
Prominence1,678 m (5,505 ft)[2]
ListingUltra
Ribu
Coordinates06°42′57″S 106°44′01″E / 6.71583°S 106.73361°E / -6.71583; 106.73361Coordinates: 06°42′57″S 106°44′01″E / 6.71583°S 106.73361°E / -6.71583; 106.73361[1]
Geography
Mount Salak is located in Java
Mount Salak
Mount Salak
Location on the island of Java
LocationJava, Indonesia
Geology
Mountain typeStratovolcano
Last eruptionJanuary 1938[1]

According to popular belief, the name "Salak" comes from salak, a tropical fruit. However, according to Sundanese tradition, the name is derived from the Sanskrit word "salaka", which means "silver".

Aviation accidents[change | change source]

This mountainous area includes areas that should be avoided by pilots of both small and large aircraft. The geological conditions and the topography full of valleys covered with vegetation, accompanied by a climate (especially the fall of fog) that changes very quickly, is very dangerous for aviation.

Aviation experts classify this mountain as "mountain of death" due to its long history of aviation accidents. The latest and largest accident was the crash of a Sukhoi Superjet 100 civilian airliner into a mountain cliff in 2012.[3][4]

References[change | change source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 "Salak". Global Volcanism Program. Smithsonian Institution.
  2. "Mountains of the Indonesian Archipelago". Peaklist.org. Retrieved 2013-08-18.
  3. "Mt. Salak: An airplane graveyard". The Jakarta Post. 10 May 2012. Archived from the original on 12 May 2012. Retrieved 11 May 2012.
  4. Vaswani, Karishma (10 May 2012). "Rescue workers find bodies at Russia jet crash site". BBC News. Retrieved 11 May 2012.

Other websites[change | change source]

Media related to Mount Salak at Wikimedia Commons