Progressive supranuclear palsy

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Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP; or the Steele-Richardson-Olszewski syndrome, after the doctors who described it in 1963) is a degenerative disease involving the deterioration and death of specific volumes of the brain.[1][2] Males and females are affected the same equally and there is no racial, geographical or occupational predilection. Approximately 6 people per 100,000 population have PSP. It has been described as a tauopathy.[3]

References[change | change source]

  1. Richardson JC, Steele J, Olszewski J (1963). "Supranuclear ophthalmoplegia, pseudobulbar palsy, nuchal dystonia and dementia. A clinical report on eight cases of 'heterogeneous system degeneration'". Transactions of the American Neurological Association. 88: 25–9. PMID 14272249.
  2. Steele JC, Richardson JC, Olszewski J (April 1964). "Progressive supranuclear palsy: a heterogeneous degeneration involving brain stem, basal ganglia and cerebellum with vertical gaze and pseudobulbar palsy, nuchal dystonia and dementia". Archives of Neurology. 10: 333–59. doi:10.1001/archneur.1964.00460160003001. PMID 14107684.
  3. Rizzo G, Martinelli P, Manners D, et al. (October 2008). "Diffusion-weighted brain imaging study of patients with clinical diagnosis of corticobasal degeneration, progressive supranuclear palsy and Parkinson's disease". Brain. 131 (Pt 10): 2690–700. doi:10.1093/brain/awn195. PMID 18819991.