Queen's Privy Council for Canada

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Queen's Privy Council for Canada
Conseil privé de la Reine pour le Canada
Langevin Block (2013)(cropped).jpg
AbbreviationPrivy Council, QPC
Formation1867
Legal statusNon-executive advisory body
Membership
List of current members
Elizabeth II
Dominic LeBlanc
Ian Shugart
Staff
Privy Council Office
Websitecanada.ca/en/privy-council.html,%20https://canada.ca/fr/conseil-prive.html

The Queen's Privy Council for Canada (QPC; French: Conseil privé de la Reine pour le Canada; called the King's Privy Council for Canada when there is a king[1][2]), sometimes called just the Privy Council,[3] is a group of people that help the monarch (king or queen) of Canada. They give advice to the monarch on things happening related to the government. The monarch or the person that represents them (the Governor General) have to follow the advice of a group of people in the Privy Council, called the cabinet. They are usually part of the government, and are usually members of Parliament (MPs). People that are part of the Privy Council are called "Privy Councillors".

When people join the Privy Council, they become members of it for the rest of their lives. They are chosen by the Governor General based on who the Prime Minister says should be in the council.[4] Because of this, many of the Privy Councillors are people that used to be part of the cabinet, but are not anymore. Other Privy Councillors might be people that have important roles, like being the Leader of the Opposition.

References[change | change source]

  1. Official Report of Debates, House of Commons. 174. Queen's Printer. 1926. p. 5237.
  2. Pike, Corinna; McCreery, Christopher (2011). Canadian Symbols of Authority: Maces, Chains, and Rods of Office. Dundurn. p. 258. ISBN 1-4597-0016-3.
  3. Privy Council Office. "Queen's Privy Council for Canada – Facts". Queen's Printer for Canada. Retrieved 15 October 2009.
  4. Hodgetts, J.e. (7 February 2006). "Privy Council". The Canadian Encyclopedia. Retrieved 13 May 2020.

Other websites[change | change source]