Robert Bunsen

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Robert Bunsen

Robert Wilhelm Eberhard Bunsen (31 March 1811 – 16 August 1899) was a German chemist. He improved the burner that has his name, but which was actually invented by Michael Faraday.

Much more important was the work he did which led to spectroscopy. Together with Gustav Kirchhoff, he developed a method of using the spectrum of light to identify the composition of solids,liquids or gases. Spectroscopy originated through the study of visible light dispersed according to its wavelength, for example, by a prism. Bunsen found the elements caesium and rubidium with his spectroscope.[1]

In 1841, Bunsen developed the Bunsen cell, by improving the Galvanic cell William Grove had developed in 1839.

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