Roscoe Arbuckle

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Roscoe Arbuckle
RoscoeArbuckleRet.jpg
Born (1887-03-24)March 24, 1887
Smith Center, Kansas, United States
Died June 29, 1933(1933-06-29) (aged 46)
New York City, New York, United States
Cause of death Heart attack
Other names Fatty Arbuckle, William Goodrich
Occupation Actor, comedian, director, screenwriter
Years active 1904–1933
Spouse(s) Minta Durfee (m. 1908–1925) «start: (1908)–end+1: (1926)»"Marriage: Minta Durfee to Roscoe Arbuckle" Location: (linkback://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roscoe_Arbuckle)
Doris Deane (m. 1925–1929) «start: (1925)–end+1: (1930)»"Marriage: Doris Deane to Roscoe Arbuckle" Location: (linkback://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roscoe_Arbuckle)
Addie Oakley Dukes McPhail (m. 1931–1933) «start: (1931)–end+1: (1934)»"Marriage: Addie Oakley Dukes McPhail to Roscoe Arbuckle" Location: (linkback://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roscoe_Arbuckle)
Website Official website

Roscoe Conkling "Fatty" Arbuckle (March 24, 1887 – June 29, 1933) was an American silent movie actor, comedian, director, and screenwriter. He helped Charlie Chaplin become an actor. He discovered Buster Keaton and Bob Hope.

Arbuckle was one of the most popular silent stars of the 1910s. He soon became one of the highest paid actors in Hollywood. He once signed a contract in 1921 with Paramount Pictures for US$1 million.

Arbuckle was accused of three counts of rape and for murdering actress Virginia Rappe.[1] Arbuckle was later found not guilty and the jury gave Arbuckle a formal apology.[1]

Arbuckle died in his sleep of a heart attack in 1933 at age 46.

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