Roy Williams (coach)

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Roy Allen Williams (born August 1, 1950) is an American college basketball coach for the North Carolina Tar Heels.

He started his college coaching career at North Carolina as an assistant coach for Dean Smith in 1978. In 1988, Williams became the head coach of the men's basketball team at Kansas, taking them to fourteen consecutive NCAA tournaments, collecting a .805 win percentage and winning nine conference titles over his fifteen-year span. In 2003, Williams left Kansas to return to his alma mater North Carolina, replacing Matt Doherty as head coach of the Tar Heels. Since returning to North Carolina, Williams has won three national championships, eight Atlantic Coast Conference conference titles, one AP National Coach of the Year award, and two ACC Coach of the Year awards.

Early years[change | change source]

Williams was born in Marion, North Carolina,[3][4] and spent his early years in the small western North Carolina towns of Marion and Spruce Pine. As a child his family relocated to nearby Asheville, where he grew up. In basketball, playing for Coach Buddy Baldwin, he was named all-county and all-conference for two years (1967 and 1968), all-western North Carolina in 1968 and served as captain in the North Carolina Blue-White All-Star Game.[5] Williams has stated that Coach Baldwin was one of the biggest influences in his life.[6]Williams went on to play on the freshman team at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and study the game under coach Dean Smith.

Early coaching years[change | change source]

Williams' first coaching job was in 1973 as a high school basketball and golf coach at Charles D. Owen High School[8] in Black Mountain, North Carolina.[5] He coached basketball and boys' golf for five years and ninth-grade football for four years, and served as athletic director for two years. In 1978, Williams came back to the University of North Carolina and served as an assistant to Coach Dean Smith from 1978 to 1988. During his tenure as assistant coach, North Carolina went 275–61 and won the NCAA national championship in 1982, the first for Smith and the second for North Carolina. One of Williams' more notable events came as assistant coach when he became instrumental in recruiting Michael Jordan.

Professional players coached[change | change source]

Kansas[change | change source]

  • Nick Collison
  • Drew Gooden
  • Darrin Hancock
  • Kirk Hinrich
  • Raef LaFrentz
  • Greg Ostertag
  • Paul Pierce
  • Scot Pollard
  • Mark Randall (basketball)|Mark Randall
  • Ryan Robertson
  • Wayne Simien
  • Billy Thomas (basketball)|Billy Thomas
  • Jacque Vaughn
  • Rex Walters

North Carolina[change | change source]

  • Harrison Barnes
  • Reggie Bullock
  • Ed Davis (basketball)|Ed Davis
  • Wayne Ellington
  • Raymond Felton
  • Danny Green (basketball)|Danny Green
  • P.J. Hairston
  • Tyler Hansbrough
  • John Henson (basketball)|John Henson
  • Brice Johnson
  • Ty Lawson
  • Kendall Marshall
  • Sean May
  • James Michael McAdoo
  • Rashad McCants
  • David Noel
  • Marcus Paige
  • J. P. Tokoto
  • Jawad Williams
  • Marvin Williams
  • Brandan Wright
  • Tyler Zeller

Head coaching record[change | change source]

Season Team Overall Conference Standing Postseason
Kansas Jayhawks (Big Eight Conference) (1988–1996)
1988–89 Kansas 19–12 6–8 6th
1989–90 Kansas 30–5 11–3 T–2nd NCAA Round of 32
1990–91 Kansas 27–8 10–4 T–1st NCAA Runner-up
1991–92 Kansas 27–5 11–3 1st NCAA Round of 32
1992–93 Kansas 29–7 11–3 1st NCAA Final Four
1993–94 Kansas 27–8 9–5 3rd NCAA Sweet Sixteen
1994–95 Kansas 25–6 11–3 1st NCAA Sweet Sixteen
1995–96 Kansas 29–5 12–2 1st NCAA Elite Eight
Kansas Jayhawks (Big 12 Conference) (1996–2003)
1996–97 Kansas 34–2 15–1 1st NCAA Sweet Sixteen
1997–98 Kansas 35–4 15–1 1st NCAA Round of 32
1998–99 Kansas 23–10 11–5 T–2nd NCAA Round of 32
1999–00 Kansas 24–10 11–5 5th NCAA Round of 32
2000–01 Kansas 26–7 12–4 T–2nd NCAA Sweet Sixteen
2001–02 Kansas 33–4 16–0 1st NCAA Final Four
2002–03 Kansas 30–8 14–2 1st NCAA Runner-up
Kansas: 418–101 (.805) 175–49 (.781)
North Carolina Tar Heels (Atlantic Coast Conference) (2003–present)
2003–04 North Carolina 19–11 8–8 6th NCAA Round of 32
2004–05 North Carolina 33–4 14–2 1st NCAA Champions
2005–06 North Carolina 23–8 12–4 2nd NCAA Round of 32
2006–07 North Carolina 31–7 11–5 T–1st NCAA Elite Eight
2007–08 North Carolina 36–3 14–2 1st NCAA Final Four
2008–09 North Carolina 34–4 13–3 1st NCAA Champions
2009–10 North Carolina 20–17 5–11 T–9th NIT Runner-up
2010–11 North Carolina 29–8 14–2 1st NCAA Elite Eight
2011–12 North Carolina 32–6 14–2 1st NCAA Elite Eight
2012–13 North Carolina 25–11 12–6 3rd NCAA Round of 32
2013–14 North Carolina 24–10 13–5 T–3rd NCAA Round of 32
2014–15 North Carolina 26–12 11–7 5th NCAA Sweet Sixteen
2015–16 North Carolina 33–7 14–4 1st NCAA Runner-up
2016–17 North Carolina 33–7 14–4 1st NCAA Champions
North Carolina: 398–115 (.776) 169–65 (.722)
Total: 816–216 (.791)

      National champion         Conference regular season champion         Conference tournament champion
      Conference regular season and conference tournament champion       Conference division champion