Salt water

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The water from this place is salt water.

Saline water (also called salt water, salt-water or saltwater) is water with salt in it. It often means the water from the seas (sea water) and oceans.

Salt water used for making or preserving food, is usually saltier than sea water and is called brine.

When scientists measure salt in water, they usually say they are testing the salinity of the water: salinity is measured in parts per thousand or ppt. Most sea water is about 35 ppt salt. Salt lakes can be up to ten times as salty. Above that level precipitation creates a salt plain.

Brackish water, in contrast, is less salty than seawater.

Salt water is more dense than fresh water. This means that it has more matter per its volume. Fresh water has a density of 1 g/ml, while salty seawater has an average density of about 1.025 g/ml.

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