Spinach

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Spinach
Spinach in flower
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Magnoliophyta
Class: Magnoliopsida
Order: Caryophyllales
Family: Amaranthaceae
Genus: Spinacia
Species: S. oleracea
Binomial name
Spinacia oleracea
L.

Spinach is a green, leafy vegetable. It comes from southwestern and central Asia. Its flowers are small and yellow. Spinach is rich in vitamin K, vitamin A, vitamin C, and folate.[1] Spinach, along with other green, leafy vegetables,[2] is rich in iron.

Here are some perceptions about spinach that come from popular culture:

  • Spinach is traditionally unpopular with children.[3]
  • The cartoon character Popeye eats spinach in order to become strong.[4]

References[change | change source]

  1. "Nutrition Facts for Spinach, raw, one NLEA serving, 30 g". Nutritiondata.com. http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/vegetables-and-vegetable-products/2626/2. Retrieved February 22, 2016.
  2. "Basic Report from the USDA National Nutrient Database: Spinach, raw, 100 g". US Department of Agriculture, National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference Release 27. 2014. http://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/foods/show/3202?fg=&man=&lfacet=&format=&count=&max=25&offset=&sort=&qlookup=spinach. Retrieved 1 February 2015.
  3. Yamasaki, Mitsuyo; Takahashi, Tatuya; Minohara, Atsuko; Ishibashi, Hisashi; Saito, Hiroshi (2001). "Changes of Food Preference in Children Aged 4 and 5 Years". Acta medica Nagasakiensia. 19 46 (3-4): 47-54. ISSN 00016055. http://naosite.lb.nagasaki-u.ac.jp/dspace/bitstream/10069/16193/1/acta46_03_09_t.pdf. Retrieved 22 February 2016.
  4. Sutton, Mike (2010). "SPINACH, IRON and POPEYE: Ironic lessons from biochemistry and history on the importance of healthy eating, healthy scepticism and adequate citation". Internet Journal of Criminology: 15. http://www.internetjournalofcriminology.com/Sutton_Spinach_Iron_and_Popeye_March_2010.pdf. Retrieved 4 November 2011.