Whitewash

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A whitewashed house in Denmark

Whitewash, also called calcimine, kalsomine, calsomine, or lime paint, is a type of paint.

Whitewash is made of slaked lime (calcium hydroxide) and chalk (calcium carbonate). It is used to make surfaces white. It protects and presents a clean surface. Whitewash may be used to paint the outsides and the insides of homes and other buildings.

Other things may be added to whitewash, such as water glass (sodium silicate), glue, egg white, Portland cement, salt, soap, milk, flour, and soil. To change the colour of whitewash, people used different materials. For example, pig's blood was used to make whitewash pink, and blue laundry dye was used to make whitewash blue.