Aluminium chloride

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Aluminium chloride
Aluminium-trichloride-hexahydrate-white-and-yellow.jpg
Aluminium-trichloride-dimer-3D-balls.png
IUPAC name aluminium chloride
Other names aluminium(III) chloride
Identifiers
CAS number 7446-70-0,
10124-27-3 (hydrate),
7784-13-6 (hexahydrate)
PubChem 24012
ChEBI CHEBI:30114
RTECS number BD0530000
ATC code D10AX01
SMILES Cl[Al](Cl)Cl
Properties
Molecular formula AlCl3
Molar mass 133.34 g/mol (anhydrous)
241.43 g/mol (hexahydrate)
Appearance white or pale yellow solid,
hygroscopic
Density 2.48 g/cm3 (anhydrous)
1.3 g/cm3 (hexahydrate)
Melting point

192.4 °C *(anhydrous)
100 °C (hexahydrate)

Boiling point

120 °C (hexahydrate)

Solubility in water 43.9 g/100 ml (0 °C)
44.9 g/100 ml (10 °C)
45.8 g/100 ml (20 °C)
46.6 g/100 ml (30 °C)
47.3 g/100 ml (40 °C)
48.1 g/100 ml (60 °C)
48.6 g/100 ml (80 °C)
49 g/100 ml (100 °C)
Solubility soluble in hydrogen chloride, ethanol, chloroform, carbon tetrachloride
slightly soluble in benzene
Structure
Crystal structure Monoclinic, mS16
Space group C12/m1, No. 12
Coordination
geometry
Octahedral (solid)
Tetrahedral (liquid)
Molecular shape Trigonal planar
(monomeric vapour)
Thermochemistry
Std enthalpy of
formation
ΔfHo298
−704 kJ·mol−1[1]
Standard molar
entropy
So298
111 J·mol−1·K−1[1]
Hazards
EU classification Corrosive (C)
R-phrases R34
S-phrases (S1/2), S7/8, S28, S45
Related compounds
Other anions Aluminium fluoride
Aluminium bromide
Aluminium iodide
Other cations Boron trichloride
Gallium trichloride
Indium(III) chloride
Magnesium chloride
Related Lewis acids Iron(III) chloride
Boron trifluoride
Except where noted otherwise, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C, 100 kPa)

Aluminium chloride (AlCl3), is a chemical compound. It is a white or yellow crystalline solid. It melts at a low temperature. It is made by reacting aluminium oxide with hydrochloric acid. The anhydrous (without water) form may be made by reacting aluminium and chlorine. It is used in the making of chemicals. It is also used in deodorants. It can cause slight irritation.

Related pages[change | change source]

Sources[change | change source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 Zumdahl, Steven S. (2009). Chemical Principles 6th Ed.. Houghton Mifflin Company. ISBN 0-618-94690-X .