Calvados (drink)

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A bottle and a glass of Calvados
Different greens show the different locations where Calvados is made

Calvados is an alcoholic drink. It is made from distilling cider in the French department of Calvados in Normandy, and also in Normandy itself. It got its name from the department, which is famous for making it.

How Calvados is made[change | change source]

Calvados is made of cider with a degree of alcohol of 12° to 15°, through a process called double distillation. In the first pass, the result is a liquid containing 28% to 30% alcohol. In a second pass, the amount of alcohol is increased to about 40%.

Since 1942, the Calvados has its own Appellation d'Origine Contrôlée (AOC), as follows:

  • The « Calvados Pays d’Auge » (25% of production): The Cidre needs to come from apples of the « Pays d'Auge ». Two rounds of distillation in an multi-pass alambic
  • The « Calvados » (74 % of production): The apples used for the cidre need to be from Normandy.
  • The « Calvados Domfrontais » (1% of production) : Base for the production are apples and pears from the region called « domfrontais », there is only one round of distillation in an columnar still.

How Calvados are served[change | change source]

The Calvados can be served either dry or with ice, as a cocktail, an aperitif, or as a digestif. It goes very well with cheese, chocolates, desserts or ice cream. You can also take your crepes with calvados.

Other websites[change | change source]