De-Stalinization

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De-Stalinization is the way that the Soviet Union tried to undo Joseph Stalin's politics and the heroic image he created of himself using propaganda.

After Stalin died, Nikita Khrushchev became the new leader of the Soviet Union. He attempted to reform the Soviet government. In order to do this, he had to change the way the public thought of Stalin, who was the leader of the old ways that Khrushchev wanted to change. He did this by many ways, but most importantly he took Stalin's body out of the mausoleum in Red Square[1] and he changed the name of Stalingrad (which was named after Stalin) to Volgograd.[2]

References[change | edit source]

  1. CNN Interactive - Almanac - October 31, CNN, http://www.cnn.com/almanac/9810/31/#today, "(October 31) 1961, Russia's de-Stalinization program reached a climax when his body was removed from the mausoleum in Red Square and re-buried."
  2. Reuters (1961-11-11), "Stalingrad Name Changed", The New York Times, http://select.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=F2091FFD355912738DDDA80994D9415B818AF1D3, "MOSCOW, Saturday, Nov. 11 (Reuters) -- The "Hero City" of Stalingrad has been renamed Volgograd, the Soviet Communist party newspaper Pravda reported today."