Denim

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Denim used for blue jeans. It has a copper rivet to make the pocket stronger.

Denim (which gets its name from the French town of Nîmes (de Nîmes)) is a very robust kind of textile. Denim has been used in the United States since the late 18th century. The word comes from the name of a fabric called serge. Serge was first made in Nîmes, France, by the André family. First called serge de Nîmes, the name was soon shortened to denim.[1] Denim was usually coloured blue with indigo dye to make blue "jeans", though "jean" meant a different, lighter cotton textile.

Uses[change | change source]

Jeans vehicles[change | change source]

Between 1973 and 1975, Volkswagen made the Jeans Beetle, which had all-denim trim. They did this again in some later models.[2]

References[change | change source]

  1. Bellis, Mary. "Levi Strauss - The History of Blue Jeans". About.com. The New York Times Company. http://inventors.about.com/od/sstartinventors/a/Levi_Strauss.htm. Retrieved 2010-08-04. ""Levi Strauss had the canvas made into waist overalls. Miners liked the pants, but complained that they tended to chafe. Levi Strauss substituted a twilled cotton cloth from France called "serge de Nîmes." The fabric later became known as denim and the pants were nicknamed blue jeans." In French of Nîmes or De Nîmes shortened to Denim"
  2. "Jeansbeetles.com". http://www.jeansbeetles.com/accueilenglish.htm. Retrieved 2010-08-04