Dysnomia (moon)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Dysnomia and Eris. Eris is the bigger object, Dysnomia is the little circle above it. The Sun is the circle of light to the left.

Dysnomia[1] is the only known moon of the dwarf planet Eris. It was found on September 10, 2005 by Michael E. Brown and his team at the W. M. Keck Observatory.[2] It is probably about 100 km in diameter (across),[2] although it may be up to 250 km in diameter.[2] The moon was named Dysnomia[3] (from the Ancient Greek word Δυσνομία that means "lawlessness") after the daughter of the Greek goddess Eris.[4]

References and notes[change | change source]

  1. Formal designation: 136199 Eris I Dysnomia; Provisional designation: S/2005 (2003 UB313) 1.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 Mike Brown. "Dysnomia, the moon of Eris". Caltech. http://web.gps.caltech.edu/~mbrown/planetlila/moon/. Retrieved 2011-04-02.
  3. IAU Circular 8747 - Official publication of the IAU reporting the naming of Eris and Dysnomia (PDF file)
  4. Atsma, Aaron J.. "DYSNOMIA". Theoi Project : Greek Mythology. http://www.theoi.com/Daimon/Dysnomia.html. Retrieved 2011-04-02.