Earl Warren

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Earl Warren
14th Chief Justice of the United States
In office
October 5, 1953[1] – June 23, 1969
Nominated by Dwight D. Eisenhower
Preceded by Fred M. Vinson
Succeeded by Warren E. Burger
30th Governor of California
In office
January 4, 1943 – October 5, 1953
Lieutenant Frederick Houser (1943–1947)
Goodwin Knight (1947–1953)
Preceded by Culbert Olson
Succeeded by Goodwin Knight
20th Attorney General of California
In office
January 3, 1939 – January 4, 1943
Governor Culbert Olson
Preceded by Ulysses S. Webb
Succeeded by Robert W. Kenny
Alameda County District Attorney
In office
1925–1939
Preceded by Ezra Decoto
Succeeded by Ralph E. Hoyt
Personal details
Born March 19, 1891(1891-03-19)
Los Angeles, California, U.S.
Died July 9, 1974(1974-07-09) (aged 83)
Washington, D.C., U.S.
Spouse(s) Nina Elisabeth Palmquist Meyers
Children Virginia Warren
Alma mater University of California, Berkeley
Religion Christianity (Methodist [1])
Signature
Military service
Allegiance  United States of America
Service/branch  United States Army
Years of service 1917–1918
Rank US-O2 insignia.svg First Lieutenant
Unit 91 Inf Div DUI.jpg 91st Division

Earl Warren (March 19, 1891 – July 9, 1974) was an American lawyer, judge and politician. He served as Governor of California from 1943 to 1953. Warren ran for Vice-President in 1948 as a Republican, but lost to Alben W. Barkley in a close election.

Warren was born in Los Angeles and grew up in Bakersfield before moving to Oakland. He served in World War I.

In 1925, he became District Attorney of Alameda County, and later Attorney General of California. In 1953, he became Chief Justice of the United States.

He was Chief Justice when the Supreme Court issued Brown v. Board of Education and Miranda vs. Arizona. These two cases were very important civil rights cases in the United States. Warren was also in control of the Warren Commission. It looked into a possible conspiracy in the killing of President Kennedy. Warren retired from the Court in 1969, and died in Washington, D.C., in 1974.

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