Gus Bodnar

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NHL president Red Dutton shown presenting the Calder Memorial Trophy to Bodnar in 1944.

August Bodnar (April 24, 1923 in Fort William, Ontario – July 1, 2005 in Oshawa, Ontario) was a Canadian professional ice hockey centre who played 12 seasons in the National Hockey League for the Toronto Maple Leafs, Chicago Black Hawks and Boston Bruins.

Playing career[change | edit source]

A native of Fort William, Ontario, Bodnar played for teams in the NHL, Thunder Bay Junior Hockey League, and the AHL hockey leagues. He also competed for the Memorial Cup as a member of the Fort William Rangers.

At 5'10, and 160 lbs, Bodnar played the position of centre for the Fort William Rangers from 1940-1943, Fort William Forts from 1942-1943, Toronto Maple Leafs from 1943-1948, Pittsburgh Hornets from 1946-1948, Chicago Blackhawks from 1947-1954, and the Boston Bruins from 1953-1955.

Bodnar retired from playing hockey in 1955, but later came back to coach. Bodnar was the Coach and Manager of the Toronto Marlboros from 1967 to 1968, Head Coach of the Salt Lake Golden Eagles in the WHL from 1970 to 1971, Head Coach of the Oshawa Generals in the OHA from 1971 to 1976, and many other Junior Teams.

Bodnar was the recipient of the Calder Memorial Trophy in 1944, and won the Stanley Cup in 1945 and 1947. Bodnar played in the 1951 NHL All-Star Game, and was the recipient of the 1971 to 1972 Coach of the Year Award. Bodnar was elected to the North Western Sports Hall of Fame in 1983, and the Oshawa Sports Hall of Fame in 1995. On July 1, 2005, Bodnar died at the Lakeridge Health Unit in Oshawa, Ontario, Canada.

Awards and achievements[change | edit source]

  • 1943–44 Calder Trophy Winner
  • 1983 Northwestern Ontario Sports Hall of Fame
  • 1995 Oshawa Sports Hall of Fame

Records[change | edit source]

  • On Oct. 30, 1943, his first game, he set the record for fastest goal by a player in his first NHL game

Other websites[change | edit source]