Italian cuisine

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Spaghetti is traditional Italian cuisine

Italian cuisine is traditional Italian food. It is not any one thing, because it is strongly regionalised. This means that the cooking is different in different parts of Italy.[1][2]

Naturally there are some basic foods which can be found all over Italy, and now in many other countries. These are pasta, pizza, cannoli pastry deserts, ice cream and red or white wine. Calamari dishes of fried squid (fried calamari) are often on the menu.[3]

Olives have been grown in Italy for thousands of years. They are eaten, and also are the basis of olive oil. Olive oil and vinaigrette or balsamic vinegar are always on the table or nearby. Italians also make many kinds of breads in a different style from French bread. Their styles of coffee have also become internationally famous. Some of their liqueurs, like limoncello, are very distinctive.

Italian cuisine is one of the most refined and varied in Europe, from the piquant flavours of Naples and Calabria to the pesto dishes of Liguria and the cheese and risotto dishes of the Italian Alps.

References[change | change source]

  1. Capatti, Alberto and Montanari, Massimo. 2003. Italian cuisine: a cultural history. New York: Columbia University Press. ISBN 0-231-12232-2
  2. Riley, Gillian 2007. The Oxford companion to Italian food. Oxford University Press ISBN 978-0-19-860617-8
  3. "Definition of calamari". Merriam-Webster's Online Dictionary. http://m-w.com/dictionary/calamari.