Levon Aronian

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Levon Aronian
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Full name Levon Aronian
Country  Armenia
Born
6 October 1982 (1982-10-06) (age 32)
Yerevan, Armenia
Title Grandmaster
FIDE rating 2812
(#2 on the April 2014 FIDE ratings list)
Peak rating 2825 (May 2012)

Levon Aronian,[1] born 6 October 1982 in Yerevan, is an Armenian chess Grandmaster. On the FIDE ranking list, he is the world's number two player and Armenia's #1.[2]

Aronian won the Chess World Cup 2005. He led the Armenian national team to the gold medals in the 37th Chess Olympiad, Turin 2006, the 38th Olympiad, Dresden 2008,[3] and the World Team Chess Championship in Ningbo, 2011. In the Chess Olympiad 2010 at Khanty-Mansiysk he won the silver medal for his individual performance on board one.[4]

He won the FIDE Grand Prix 2008–2010, qualifying him for the Candidates tournament for the World Chess Championship 2012, where he was knocked out in the first round.

Aronian has had a string of outstanding tournament results since reaching the top with a joint win at Wijk aan Zee 2008.[5] His latest, and perhaps greatest victory was in January 2012, at the same Tata Steel Chess Tournament in Wijk aan Zee. The field included world #1 Magnus Carlsen, defending champion Hikaru Nakamura, and former world champion Veselin Topalov, among others. The average rating of the field was 2755, making this thirteen-round event a category 21 tournament.[6] After twelve rounds, Aronian was in clear first place with 8.5 points going into the final round, one point ahead of Carlsen and Teimour Radjabov.[7] In the final round, Aronian drew against Radjabov with the white pieces in the King's Indian Defence. With the draw, Aronian finished with 9/13 (+5), a tournament performance rating of 2891. He took clear first place a point ahead of Carlsen, Radjabov and Fabiano Caruana.[8][9]

Aronian was declared the best sportsman of Armenia in 2005,[10] and was awarded the title of "Honoured Master of Sport of the Republic of Armenia" in 2009.

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